My Master Has No Tail PV trailer centers on the sickly Ebisuya Utaroku

My Master Has No Tail
Who is Ebisuya Utaroku, and why is he so sickly? Pic credit: Liden Films

On August 27, 2022, @shippona_anime posted a new My Master Has No Tail PV trailer centering on Ebisuya Utaroku. The PV is 30 seconds, but we learn quite a bit about him.

The most prominent is he’s a smoker and coughs a lot. But according to the My Master Has No Tail anime website, he’s also quite sickly.

And yet, he’s able to put on a performance that easily captures an audience.

My Master Has No Tail key visual
Key visual for the upcoming anime My Master Has No Tail. Pic credit: Crunchyroll

Who is Ebisuya Utaroku?

Without going into spoilers, Utaroku is a performer specializing in the Synchronization of the buntori. A popular kind of Rakugo that is rich with emotional expressions and can make the characters seem alive.

He’s a heavy smoker and is very sickly. If the anime closely follows the manga, fans will have to wait for a few episodes to meet him.

TVアニメ「うちの師匠はしっぽがない」キャラクターPV(恵比寿家歌緑ver.)

Akira Ishida is voicing Utaroku, and he’s also voicing several characters in different anime. Naruto and Boruto fans know him as Garra, Cho Hakkai in Saiyuki Reload: Zeroin, Shun Kamiya in Tribe Nine, Duke of Richmond in Requiem of the Rose King, Luxion in Trapped in a Dating Sim: The World of Otome Games Is Tough for Mobs, Domitianus in Skeleton Knight in Another World, Seiji Aizawa in Tokyo Mew Mew New and more.

What is Rakugo?

Rakugo is a form of storytelling where one person sits on a raised platform, called a Koza, and uses a paper fan, a senzu, and a small cloth, known as a tenguai, as props and without leaving the sitting position, seiza. Tells a long and complicated story with two or more characters, and the characters are known by tone, pitch, and turn of the head.

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The stories are often comical but can also be sentimental. Rakugo was initially known as karakuchi and dated back to 1787.

In the Meiji Period, 1868-1912, it began to be known as Rakugo, but in the Showa period, 1926-1989, it became commonly used. Rakugo has been called a sitcom with one person playing all the parts by Noriko Watanabe, an assistant professor at Baruch College.

Like many other forms of entertainment, Rakugo has been divided into multiple types. Shibaibanaishi or theatre, ongyokubanashi or musical, kaidenbanashi or ghost, and ninjobanashi or sentimental are some of the most popular.

Are you excited about My Master Has No Tail? Leave a comment and let us know what you think.

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